Posts Tagged LSVT LOUD

LSVT Global Heads to World Parkinson Congress

LSVT Global will be attending the 5th World Parkinson Congress (WPC), in Kyoto, Japan. The WPC is a unique event. As described by WPC, "each Congress brings together physicians, neuroscientists, a broad range of other health professionals, care partners, and people with PD (PwPs) for a unique and inspiring experience. Cross pollinating members of the community is important in the effort to expedite the discovery of a cure and cultivate best treatment practices for this devastating disease." LSVT Global is proud to have participated in every WPC held to date - and we look forward to next week in Kyoto.   LSVT Global Booth Stop by Booth 501 to learn more about LSVT LOUD and LSVT BIG speech, physical, and occupational therapies for Parkinson’s. Talk to LSVT experts, pick up some information, and even grab a little swag. We have handouts in English and Japanese. Posters Wednesday, June 5th, 2019 11:30 AM – 1:30 PM Global Implementation of Efficacious Voice Treatment for Parkinson's Disease: LSVT LOUD® Germany, France, and Japan. Poster Board 22.44 Speech Intelligibility of Individuals with Parkinson's Disease in Noise Following Voice or Articulation Treatment. Poster Board 22.51 Thursday, June 6th, 2019 11:30 AM – 1:30 PM GlobalContinue Reading

Parkinson’s Patients Get BIG and LOUD in Therapy

DES MOINES, Iowa -- Gene Motter was 48 years old when he was diagnosed with Parkinson's disease. “I was [an] early onset patient and I'm now 60. So for 12 years I’ve had it,” Motter said. In those 12 years, he has struggled with some everyday tasks. “Parkinson’s, you have a hard time putting on your shoes and socks at times,” Motter said. That's when Motter decided he had enough. “I was kind of at my wits end,” Motter said. “I mean, medication only takes you so far with this. You just keep taking medicine, taking medicine but it doesn't always make it better. [But] these girls really made it better.” The girls Motter is referring to are a part of UnityPoint Health’s LSVT BIG and LOUD program. “Big, literally meaning big movement,” Esada Mujcic, UnityPoint Health Occupational Therapist said. “For the loud portion what we are working on is getting their voice not only louder, but to have better clarity,” Katelyn Goettsch, UnityPoint Health Speech Pathologist said. The physical therapy is filled with a wide range of repetitive activities to help not only improve function but also slow motor deterioration. “You think, ‘what the heck am I doing,’ but theContinue Reading

Keys to successful speech treatment in people with Parkinson’s disease

Current Perspectives on the Lee Silverman Voice Treatment (LSVT) for Individuals With Idiopathic Parkinson Disease Cynthia M. Fox, Chris E. Morrison, Lorraine Olson Ramig, Shimon Sapir American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, May 2002, American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) DOI: 10.1044/1058-0360(2002/012) What is it about? Speech treatment for people with Parkinson’s disease (PD) was previously unsuccessful. An approach, called LSVT LOUD, was developed in the late 1980s. At that time, LSVT LOUD was substantially different from traditional speech treatment in several ways. This article reviewed the novel concepts of this approach. These included a single focus on vocal loudness, intensive delivery, sensory retraining, and a simple and redundant treatment cue, "speak loud". Why is it important? This article summarized, for the first time, novel and key concepts for why and how speech treatment could work and last for people with PD. At the time LSVT LOUD was developed, the outlook for improving speech in people with PD was very grim. One quote stated, “…voice treatment for disorders that are degenerative is controversial since there is no expectation for recovery of function or that any improvement secondary to speech language pathology intervention will be maintained in the long term” (Hillman et al., 1990;Continue Reading

Technology-supported delivery of effective speech treatment for Parkinson disease

Read our research Kudos! This study provided the first evidence that individuals with PD who used the LSVTCompanion had treatment gains comparable to individuals who received the standard in-person LSVT LOUD.

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Dr. Lorraine Ramig receives the WPC Award for Distinguished Contribution to the Parkinson Community

Join us in congratulating Dr. Lorraine Ramig who has been selected to be one of the recipients of the WPC Award for Distinguished Contribution to the Parkinson Community.  This award will be presented at the World Parkinson Congress in Kyoto, Japan on June 5th, 2019.

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Improving Communication in Children with Cerebral Palsy

Children with cerebral palsy can have difficulties talking with their family and friends. We studied the effects of a novel intensive speech treatment in five children with cerebral palsy. Our results demonstrated a number of findings post-treatment. First, it showed that the children could tolerate the intensive treatment. Second, listeners rated speech samples of the children as louder, clearer and easier to understand. For most kids, these improvements were maintained six weeks after treatment. Parents also reported some improvements in speech outside of the treatment room.

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Improving speech in individuals with Parkinson’s disease

Read our research Kudos! In this first post, learn more about the scientific bases of LSVT LOUD! The evidence provided by this 1995 study formed the foundation for the next 20 years of our research in speech treatment for Parkinson disease. We will be posting research Kudos weekly for Better Hearing and Speech Month.

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Increasing Awareness of LSVT BIG®: Emphasizing Occupation

I have seen the incredible results of the LSVT BIG with numerous clients over the course of my fieldwork experiences. Based on my experiences, I believe that participation in the individualized LSVT BIG program first to recalibrate the sensory-motor system prior to participation in community-based group exercise is the most beneficial way to maximize outcomes and enhance functional performance.

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Announcing the 2018 LSVT Global Small Student Grant Winners!- Occupational Therapy Awardees

We congratulate the 2018 Occupational Therapy student grant recipients! Each student received a $1,500 small student grant from LSVT Global, to be used during the 2018-2019 academic year. These unrestricted grants provide funding to help support their treatment research projects. Download information about our 2019 Student Grant competition for occupational therapy students here. Letters of Intent are due May 17, 2019.  Domestic and International applications are welcome.  Proposals and Application Due: June 28, 2019 Occupational Therapy Awardees Nataya Branjerdporn Occupational Therapist, PhD Student Queensland Cerebral Palsy and Rehabilitation Research Centre University of Queensland, Australia  “Driving change for infants at high risk of cerebral palsy in low-resource contexts: An innovative community-based parent-delivered early intervention program.”     Significance: Cerebral palsy is the most prevalent physical disability in children around the world and may lead to less favourable occupational performance. Eight in ten children with cerebral palsy are born into low-resource contexts, such as India, where financial hardship and remoteness contribute to difficulties accessing therapies that enable children to participate in meaningful occupations and experience optimal quality of life. A new approach called the Learning through Everyday Activities with Parents (LEAP-CP) program responds to this need by training local mothers to develop therapeuticContinue Reading

Speech Treatment in Parkinson’s Disease: Randomized Controlled Trial (RCT)

This randomized controlled trial contributes to closing the gap on effective speech treatments for Parkinson’s. It provides additional support for voice (LSVT LOUD) as an efficacious target when delivered intensively in the treatment of speech in PD with outcomes sustained for both objective (SPL) and participant-reported (CETI-M) measures.

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